Posts Tagged ‘Liberalism’

Interesting free online home study course offered by Cato institute.
Check it out if you’re interested in stimulating your ideas in liberty.

Enjoy.

Cato Home Study Course

Spend time with some of the world’s greatest minds and truest friends of freedom

Professionally prepared audio programs on the historical, philosophical, economic, legal, and moral foundations of individual liberty and limited government
Listen/Download at no cost
Programs you can enjoy at your own pace
Extensive topic summaries prepared on each major subject

When was the last time you were truly energized by ideas? In our WiFi, high def, high res, compressed digital, podcast and video clip era of 24-hour news channels and sound bites – how can you gain calm perspective and thoughtful understanding? Whatever happened to real thinking?

For that, you can turn to the Cato Home Study Course. It offers you the opportunity to deepen your perspectives, knowledge, and insight through exposure to some of the world’s most compelling thinkers. The growth of human freedom – and with it science, culture, and capitalist prosperity – are examined, explained, and clarified through the works and ideas of some of our civilization’s most brilliant thinkers. Mastering their ideas can make you a more effective advocate of freedom, a more informed and interesting member of your community, and someone more people will turn to for guidance and insights.

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Good one over at JD’s place:

The evolution of liberalism…

J. D. Pendry

I just returned from a two-week trip to Korea. My jets are still lagging, which might explain why I was wide-awake at 0300. If my jet lag runs its typical course, I should be sleeping soundly somewhere mid-sermon.

Korea is an interesting place and an interesting lesson. My history there goes back to 1972 when I was an Army Private in I Corps stationed at Camp Red Cloud in Uijongbu, Korea. Uijongbu is just down the road a piece from communist North Korea and the world’s most heavily fortified and defended border along the 38th latitudinal parallel north, which if your curious about such things also passes through Wild Wonderful West Virginia where I sit this early Sunday morning. Although today’s average public school product probably could not tell you this, the Korean War never ended officially. There exists only a cease-fire. In 1972, dirt streets and roads were common to many areas. Most Koreans had neither a telephone nor a car. Women wading through the flooded paddies mostly planted rice by hand. In the countryside, thatched roofs were common and many rural areas still had no electricity.

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