Posts Tagged ‘Hero’

…is well worth your time.

11 Facts About Medal of Honor Recipient Clinton Romesha

BY: Washington Free Beacon Staff
January 17, 2013 3:59 pm

Former Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha (ROE-muh-shay), 31, will receive the Medal of Honor next month for heroic actions during the day-long attack on Combat Outpost Keating in Afghanistan.

More than 300 Taliban attacked Keating early in the morning of Oct. 3, 2009, from all four sides and from higher ground. Armed with recoilless rifles, rocket-propelled grenades, mortars, machine guns, and rifles, the Taliban swarmed the site, occupied by only 53 Americans and two Latvians. A score of Afghans stationed there had abandoned the site. Mortars hit Keating every 15 seconds during the first three hours of the attack. Taliban breached the site and destroyed 70 percent of Keating with a fire.

More

Go to Blackfive and make sure you check this out:

BLACKFIVE: The Last Known Sighting of an American Hero.

Sign the petition:

To:  United States

A PETITION TO PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH TO AWARD THE PRESIDENTIAL MEDAL OF FREEDOM TO C.R.”RICK” RESCORLA FOR HEROISM AND GALLANTRY BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY ON SEPTEMBER 11,2001.

MR. RESCORLA CAME TO THIS COUNTRY AS AN IMMIGRANT TO BECOME AN OFFICER IN THE ARMY. MR RESCORLA SERVED WITH SUCH DISTINCTION AS AN OFFICER IN VIET NAM THAT ALL WHO SERVED WITH HIM CONSIDER HIM THE BRAVEST MAN WE HAVE EVER KNOWN. HE WAS HIGHLY DECORATED FOR HIS BRAVERY AND LEADERSHIP IN COMBAT. HE BECAME A US CITIZEN AND SOUGHT A HIGHER EDUCATION OBTAINING A BACHELOR AND MASTERS DEGREE AT UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA AND FURTHER OBTAINING A LAW DEGREE BEFORE SERVING A AS TEACHER AT USC LAW SCHOOL BEFORE BEING LURED TO THE WORLD OF COMMERCIAL BANKING. MR. RESCORLA’S SPECIALTY WAS SECURITY AND SECURITY LAW. IN 1993 HE WAS THE LAST MAN OUT OF THE TRADE TOWERS AFTER EVACUATING EVERYONE. ON SEPT.11TH IN SPITE OF BEING TOLD HIS BUILDING WAS NOT IN DANGER, HE IMPLEMENTED THE EVACUATION PLAN HE HAD DEVELOPED FOR HIS FIRM, MORGAN STANLEY. AS A DIRECT RESULT OF HIS EFFORTS THAT DAY AND HIS QUICK ACTION, OVER 2600 EMPLOYEES WERE SAVED. MR RESCORLA WAS LAST SEEN GOING UP TO RESCUE PEOPLE WHO WERE UNABLE TO GET DOWN. HIS ACTIONS REFLECT THE VERY BEST ABOUT AMERICA, ITS CITIZENS AND ITS DREAMS.

THE UNDERSIGNED URGE YOU TO RECOGNIZE MR RESCORLA BY BESTOWING THIS HIGHEST HONOR TO THIS MOST DESERVING MAN.

Sincerely,

Here’s the story from the Army News Service:

Army News Service

WASHINGTON, June 1, 2011 – An Army Ranger who lost his right hand and suffered shrapnel wounds after throwing an armed grenade away from his fellow soldiers will be the second living Medal of Honor recipient from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

On July 12, President Barack Obama will present the nation’s highest award for battlefield gallantry to Sgt. 1st Class Leroy Arthur Petry for his actions during May 26, 2008, combat operations against an armed enemy in Afghanistan’s Paktia province.

Petry now serves as part of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 75th Ranger Regiment, at Fort Benning, Ga.

“It’s very humbling to know that the guys thought that much of me and my actions that day to nominate me for that,” said Petry, on learning he had been nominated for the medal.

At the time of his actions in Afghanistan, Petry was assigned to Company D, 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. His actions came as part of a rare daylight raid to capture a high-value target.

Petry was to locate himself with the platoon headquarters in the targeted building once it was secured. Once there, he was to serve as the senior noncommissioned officer at the site for the remainder of the operation.

Recognizing one of the assault squads needed help clearing their assigned building, Petry relayed to the platoon leader that he was moving to that squad to provide additional supervision and guidance. Once the residential portion of the building had been cleared, Petry took a fellow member of the assault squad, Pfc. Lucas Robinson, to clear the outer courtyard. Petry knew that area had not been cleared during the initial clearance.

Petry and Robinson, both Rangers, moved into an area of the compound that contained at least three enemy fighters who were prepared to engage friendly forces from opposite ends of the outer courtyard.

As the two soldiers entered the courtyard, to their front was an opening, followed by a chicken coop. As they crossed the open area, an enemy insurgent fired on them. Petry was wounded by one round, which went through both of his legs. Robinson was also hit in his side plate by a separate round.

While wounded and under enemy fire, Petry led Robinson to the cover of the chicken coop as the enemy fighters continued to fire at them.

As the senior soldier, Petry assessed the situation. He reported that contact was made and that two wounded Rangers were in the courtyard of the primary target building. Upon hearing the report, Sgt. Daniel Higgins, a team leader, moved to the outer courtyard.

As Higgins was moving to Petry and Robinson’s position, Petry threw a thermobaric grenade near the enemy position. Shortly after that grenade exploded and created a lull in the enemy fire, Higgins arrived at the chicken coop and was assessing his comrades’ wounds when an insurgent threw a grenade over the chicken coop at the three Rangers. The grenade landed about 10 yards from the soldiers, knocking them to the ground and wounding Higgins and Robinson.

Shortly after the grenade exploded, Staff Sgt. James Roberts and Spc. Christopher Gathercole entered the courtyard and moved toward the chicken coop.

With three soldiers taking cover in the chicken coop, an enemy fighter threw another grenade at them. This time, the grenade landed just a few feet from Higgins and Robinson. Recognizing the threat that the enemy grenade posed to his fellow Rangers, Petry — despite his own wounds and with complete disregard for his personal safety — consciously and deliberately risked his life to move to and secure the live enemy grenade and throw it away from his fellow Rangers, according to battlefield reports.

As Petry released the grenade in the direction of the enemy, preventing the serious injury or death of Higgins and Robinson, it detonated and amputated his right hand.

Petry assessed his wound and placed a tourniquet on his right arm. He then reported that he was still in contact with the enemy and that he had been wounded again.

After the blast that amputated Petry’s hand, Roberts began to engage the enemy behind the chicken coop with small-arms fire and a grenade. His actions suppressed the insurgents behind the chicken coop. Shortly after, another enemy fighter on the east end of the courtyard began firing, fatally wounding Gathercole.

Higgins and Robinson returned fire and killed the enemy.

Moments later, Sgt. 1st Class Jerod Staidle, the platoon sergeant, and Spc. Gary Depriest, the platoon medic, arrived in the outer courtyard. After directing Depriest to treat Gathercole, Staidle moved to Petry’s position. Staidle and Higgins then assisted Petry as he moved to the casualty collection point.

Higgins later wrote in a statement, “If not for Staff Sergeant Petry’s actions, we would have been seriously wounded or killed.”

Petry is the ninth servicemember to have been named a recipient of the Medal of Honor for actions in Afghanistan and Iraq. All but Petry and Army Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta were awarded the honor posthumously.

Army Spc. Ross A. McGinnis, Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul R. Smith, Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael A. Monsoor and Marine Corps Cpl. Jason L. Dunham all received the Medal of Honor for actions in Iraq. Giunta, Army Staff Sgt. Robert Miller, Army Sgt. 1st Class Jared C. Monti and Navy Lt. Michael P. Murphy were awarded the Medal of Honor for actions in Afghanistan.

Petry currently serves as a liaison officer for the U.S. Special Operations Command Care Coalition Northwest Region, and provides oversight to wounded warriors, ill and injured servicemembers and their families.

He enlisted in the Army from his hometown of Santa Fe, N.M., in September 1999. After completion of One Station Unit Training, the Basic Airborne Course and the Ranger Assessment and Selection Program — all at Fort Benning — he was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.

Petry has served as a grenadier, squad automatic rifleman, fire team leader, squad leader, operations sergeant and weapons squad leader. He has deployed eight times, with two tours to Iraq and six tours to Afghanistan.

Petry and his wife, Ashley, have four children: Brittany, Austin, Reagan and Landon.

We, as a nation seem to have forgotten that we are at war.

I lost a good friend to this fucking war. I think about him all the time. One of the last things he told me in an email, was right after he was promoted to major, that I was the reason he decided to stay in the Army and make it a career. I was his platoon sergeant, he was the last platoon leader that I would have in the Army. He was my son’s godfather.

Yeah, it’s personal.

Go read this article from the Washington Post. EVERY American should be required to read it.

Lt. Gen. John Kelly, who lost son to war, says U.S. largely unaware of sacrifice

Before he addressed the crowd that had assembled in the St. Louis Hyatt Regency ballroom last November, Lt. Gen. John F. Kelly had one request. “Please don’t mention my son,” he asked the Marine Corps officer introducing him.

Four days earlier, 2nd Lt. Robert M. Kelly , 29, had stepped on a land mine while leading a platoon of Marines in southern Afghanistan. He was killed instantly.

Without once referring to his son’s death, the general delivered a passionate and at times angry speech about the military’s sacrifices and its troops’ growing sense of isolation from society.

“Their struggle is your struggle,” he told the ballroom crowd of former Marines and local business people. “If anyone thinks you can somehow thank them for their service, and not support the cause for which they fight – our country – these people are lying to themselves. . . . More important, they are slighting our warriors and mocking their commitment to this nation.”

More

A True Hero has Passed.

Posted: 24 Feb 2010 in Hero, Military, US Army
Tags: , ,

A true hero has passed.

RIP Colonel.

Today, at Arlington National Cemetery, we lay to rest COL(R) Robert L. Howard.

    Color image from the Robert L. Howard Tribute website.

The link for the interview is at the end of this email.

Read a bit about Howard at one of these links: The Robert L. Howard Tribute Website, The Congressional Medal of Honor Society Website, The Washington Post– Medal of Honor recipient Col. Robert L. Howard dies at 70.

COL(R) Howard was arguably America’s most highly decorated Warrior ever, earning more awards for valor (10) than Audie Murphy, but he was surely America’s most highly decorated living warrior until his death.  The US Army Special Forces Command (Airborne) Biographical Sketch.

More

Four officers killed by a low life piece of shit. He was pardoned by Mike Huckabee 10 years ago. Just in case you were wondering, Huckabee is a RINO.

But, the true issue here is that a known felon killed four police officers in a cold blooded ambush. Completely unprovoked.

My prayers for their families; may God have mercy on their souls and give peace to their families and strength in this hour of mourning.

City of Lakewood Identifies Slain Police Officers

Lakewood Police Chief Bret Farrar publicly identified the four slain police officers after an extensive and very difficult notification process. “All four of our slain officers had been with this department since it started five years ago. Sergeant Mark Renninger and Officers Ronald Owens, Tina Griswold, and Greg Richards were police veterans when they started and all have been outstanding professionals. This is a very difficult time for our families and our officers. The families will have many challenges ahead of them and we ask that their privacy be respected. Please keep our families and Lakewood Police in your prayers.”

+

Clockwise from top left: Lakewood Police officers Greg Richards, Mark Renninger, Tina Griswold and Ronald Owens.

 

Cops: Suspect in Officer Executions May Be Dead

SEATTLE —  A suspect in the slaying of four police officers who were gunned down in a suburban coffee shop was surrounded by police at a Seattle house early Monday, wounded and possibly dead, police said.

Negotiators were trying to communicate with Maurice Clemmons, 37, using loudspeakers, explosions and even a robot to try to prod him from hiding. At one point, gunshots rang through the neighborhood, about 30 miles from the original crime scene.

“We have determined that in fact he has been shot,” said Ed Troyer, a spokesman for the Pierce County Sheriff. “He may be deceased from his gunshot wound.

Clemmons, who has a long criminal history — including a long prison sentence commuted by former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee nearly a decade ago — became the prime target Sunday in the search for the killer of Lakewood police Sgt. Mark Renninger, 39, and Officers Ronald Owens, 37, Tina Griswold, 40, and Greg Richards, 42.

More

Update:

Seattle Police: Cop-Killing Suspect on the Loose

Police in Washington state say the suspect in the killings of four police officers in a Seattle-area coffee shop is not inside the house that they’ve surrounded since early Monday morning.

Negotiators spent the night trying to communicate with 37-year-old Maurice Clemmons, but discovered after a search of the Seattle house and that the suspect was not inside.

More

 

Operation Market Garden…

Posted: 17 Oct 2009 in Hero, Military, Truth
Tags: ,

If you haven’t already done so, you should check out this dispatch from Michael Yon. He took a break from Afghanistan and headed to Holland for a ceremony that takes place over there every year in celebration of the veterans who liberated them in World War II.

Lots of pictures and commentary by Michael.

Enjoy:

Market Garden

Kudos to FedEx…

Posted: 30 Sep 2009 in Hero, Uncategorized
Tags: ,

Kudos to FedEx! These guys deserve your business. They just earned mine.

FedEx flies terminally ill girl home
By CELIA DEWOODY

Because of caring people and a caring company, a terminally ill little Green Forest girl was flown home Friday by air ambulance from M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, so she can spend her last days surrounded by the people who love her most.

Jada Harper, who turned seven on Sept. 1, has an inoperable malignant tumor in her brain and is in a coma with a ventilator doing her breathing for her. She has been at the famous cancer center in Houston since July, but her situation is now at the point not much else can be done to help her.

More

Distinguished Service Cross…

Posted: 18 Sep 2009 in Hero, Military
Tags: ,

I’m going to highlight a few Distinguished Service Cross recipients again. There is no way I can list all the recipients by the date of action. That alone would take pages that I just couldn’t keep up with.

So, I will try to represent awardees from each of the major conflicts that the US has been involved in as often as I can.

Fred Crowley

Fred Crowley was one of only TWO U.S. Marines to be awarded the Army’s Distinguished Service Cross during the Vietnam War, or since.

Awards and Citations
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to First Lieutenant Fred R. Crowley (MCSN: 0-94635), United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 1, United States Army Advisory Group, I Corps Tactical Zone. First Lieutenant Crowley (USMC) distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 September 1968 as assistant senior advisor to the Fourth Battalion, 51st Regiment, Army of the Republic of Vietnam during a battle with North Vietnamese troops south of DaNang. While radioing for a helicopter to evacuate three Vietnamese soldiers who had been badly wounded, Lieutenant Crowley was shot by an enemy sniper. Wishing to remain as alert as possible, he refused morphine which was offered to relieve the pain of his serious wounds and continued to pass vital information on the radio while being carried to the landing zone. As the ambulance helicopter came in, it was struck by hostile fire, overturned and crashed in flames within ten meters of the waiting casualties. Intense small arms and mortar fire sprayed the area, which was lit up by the burning ship. With complete disregard for his own welfare, Lieutenant Crowley organized the rescue of the wounded Vietnamese and helped direct the seven injured crew members and passengers to safety. Though aggravating his wounds, he then picked up his radio and crawled to the command post. After requesting another ambulance ship, he assisted the injured pilots, holding canteens while those with hands drank. When the second helicopter arrived, Lieutenant Crowley again directed the movement of the wounded to the bullet-swept landing zone. Almost unconscious from loss of blood, he reached the craft with the assistance of a comrade and was safely evacuated. First Lieutenant Crowley’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Marine Corps.

Service: Marine Corps
Rank: First Lieutenant
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 608 (February 20, 1969)

Raymond Enners

Date of birth: 5 Nov. 1945
Home of record: Farmingdale, N.Y.
Raymond Enners graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Class of 1967.

Awards and Citations
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded for actions during the Vietnam War

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Raymond James Enners (ASN: OF-111531), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. First Lieutenant Enners distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 September 1968 while serving as a platoon leader during a combat sweep near the village of Ha Thanh. While moving across a small valley, his platoon was ambushed by a reinforced North Vietnamese Army squad firing machine guns, automatic weapons and small arms from camouflaged positions on a hillside. A squad leader was severely wounded and fell within twenty meters of the communists. Helplessly trapped by raking fire from the enemy gunners, the badly bleeding squad leader called for help, but the deadly hostile fire kept anyone from reaching him. Lieutenant Enners, hearing his cries, began moving forward to rescue him. From his position one hundred meters back, he crawled forward through the rice paddies and leaped across the intervening dikes, dodging through continuous bursts of enemy fire until he reached his forward squad trapped behind a dike twenty meters from the fallen squad leader. With the aid of one of the other squad leaders, he dispersed his men and signaled for covering fire. He and the squad leader then jumped over the dike and ran forward through the blistering fire to within ten meters of the wounded man, but were forced to turn back when the North Vietnamese began throwing grenades. Calling for a second burst of cover fire, the two men again raced across the bullet-ridden paddies, only to be halted again by the shrapnel of exploding grenades. Returning to the scant cover of the dike, Lieutenant Enners reorganized his men, maneuvering one squad twenty meters to the right of the enemy emplacements and directing the remainder of the platoon to areas from which they could lay down the most effective cross fire. Signaling a third time for his men to open up on the aggressors, he and the squad leader vaulted the dike and again attempted to reach the wounded man. Braving rounds scorching the air around them, they raced to the injured man’s position and took cover behind the dike, After applying first aid to the man’s wounds while the squad leader fired at the North Vietnamese, Lieutenant Enners picked up the injured man, again disregarding the risk to his own life to carry him back across the battlefield to the care of medical aidmen. Moving the squad on the right through a hail of fire, he moved to within fifteen meters of the enemy before he was fatally wounded by hostile machine gun fire. First Lieutenant Enners’ extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Service: Army
Rank: First Lieutenant
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 403 (February 5, 1969)

Isidro Urbano

Home of record: San Francisco, Calif.

Awards and Citations
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Isidro D. Urbano (ASN: 0-1324892), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Urbano distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 18 September 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Urbano was leading a patrol that had been ordered to assault an enemy-held hill for the purpose of taking prisoners of war. As the group was approaching the objective, it was pinned down by an intense barrage of sniper, machine-gun, and mortar fire. In the devastating rain of fire, the patrol became disorganized and suffered numerous casualties. Disregarding his personal safety, Lieutenant Urbano moved among the men, reorganized them and encouraging them. He was preparing to move on to their objective when he received order from the battalion commander to withdraw. As he supervised the withdrawal, Lieutenant Urbano saw a wounded comrade lying in an exposed position. Unhesitatingly he moved towards the wounded man in an attempt to rescue him, firing his weapon at the enemy as ranks. Lieutenant Urbano almost reached his comrade when he was mortally wounded.

Service: Army
Rank: First Lieutenant
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 507 (May 24, 1953)

Peter Monfore

Date of birth: 10 Aug. 1927
Home of record: Bon Homme, S.D.
Peter Monfore was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, Class of 1950.

Awards and Citations
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded for actions during the Korean War

The President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Peter Howland Monfore (ASN: 0-62499), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while commanding Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Monfore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea, on the night of 18 – 19 September 1951. On that night, Lieutenant Monfore received orders to lead his company in an attack against a numerically superior hostile force occupying heavily fortified positions on a key terrain feature. On the morning of 19 September 1951, the friendly forces had fought its way, yard by yard, to its objective under the inspiring leadership of Lieutenant Monfore, who had consistently remained with the leading assault elements, exhorting his men onward. After reaching the objective, Lieutenant Monfore deployed his men in defensive positions in anticipation of the enemy counterattack which was inevitable. It began with a tremendous artillery and mortar barrage which inflicted many casualties among the already battered friendly force. Disregarding his own personal safety, Lieutenant Monfore constantly moved about the exposed terrain, calming his men and inspiring confidence. Immediately after the barrage abated, two battalions of the enemy launched a fanatic attack to regain the hill. For five and a half hours the battle raged with the friendly troops repeatedly hurling the enemy back. Realizing that the ammunition of his small force was practically exhausted, Lieutenant Monfore moved about the fire-swept terrain, gathering ammunition and weapons from both friendly and enemy casualties. At one point, he found a friendly gun crew dead in its emplacement. Without hesitation, he manned the machine-gun and poured a devastating volume of fire into the onrushing ranks of the enemy. When the ammunition of the friendly troops was almost depleted, he ordered them to withdraw. As he moved about the terrain in order to direct his men as they withdrew, Lieutenant Monfore was killed by enemy sniper fire.

Service: Army
Rank: First Lieutenant
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 62 (January 31, 1952)

Thomas Greene
Home of record: Luna County, N.M.

Awards and Citations
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Thomas A. Greene (ASN: 38103835), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 15th Armored Infantry Battalion, 5th Armored Division, in action against enemy forces on 18 September 1944, in Germany. A squad of armored infantrymen accompanied by a tank was assigned the mission of pushing through enemy positions to regain contact with the battalion Command Post. Staff Sergeant Greene, though wounded the previous day, voluntarily accompanied his comrades on the dangerous assignment. Near the enemy lines, the tank received a direct hit. While its crew members were attempting to dismount, two men were seriously wounded. Disregarding heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire placed by the enemy upon the disabled tank, Staff Sergeant Greene advanced unhesitatingly to aid the wounded men. He ignored the pleas of his comrades to return to the rear when the squad was ordered to withdraw and chose to remain with the men. When intense enemy mortar fire began to fall in the area, Staff Sergeant Greene with calm efficiency and at the risk of his own life, continued to render medical treatment. He was last seen attempting to drag his wounded comrades to the safety of a nearby ditch. By his display of fearless courage, tenacity of purpose and unflinching devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Greene exemplified the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflected great credit upon himself, the 5th Armored Division, and the United States Army.

Service: Army
Rank: Staff Sergeant
Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 82 (1944)

Stanley Stevens
Home of record: Solano, Calif.

Awards and Citations
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Sergeant Stanley E. Stevens (ASN: 39399951), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company G, 3d Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division, in action against enemy forces on 18 September 1944, at Nijmegen, Holland. In an attack by Company G into the city of Nijmegen, to seize and hold the highway bridge within that city, Staff Sergeant Stevens led the point of his company advance with such courage and aggressiveness that his company was able to continue its attack without delay. Staff Sergeant Stevens led his men in clearing snipers from several houses. At one point he attacked a building single-handed, and killed two Germans manning a machine gun while another group cleared a building across the street. After the company had advanced farther into the city, at least two German machine guns began firing into the column, pinning down the entire company. Staff Sergeant Stevens maneuvered his point from the line of enemy fire. He established a base of fire to cover the German positions and without other assistance, assaulted one position with sub-machine gun and grenades, destroying the position. He succeeded in diverting the fire of the enemy upon himself and permitted his company to neutralize the position. During the action he was mortally wounded. The exemplary conduct and outstanding bravery of Staff Sergeant Stevens, and his willingness to close with the enemy, contributed in large measure to the success of his company attack and rendered a distinguished service in the accomplishment of his company and battalion mission. His intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 82d Airborne Division, and the United States Army.

Service: Army
Rank: Sergeant
Headquarters, XVIII Airborne Corps, General Orders No. 14 (1944)

James Cupp

Awards and Citations
Navy Cross

Awarded for actions during the World War II

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Captain James N. Cupp (MCSN: 0-9004), United States Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service in the line of his profession as Division Leader and a Pilot in Marine Fighting Squadron TWO HUNDRED THIRTEEN (VMF-213), Marine Air Group ELEVEN (MAG-11), FIRST Marine Aircraft Wing, in aerial combat against enemy Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands Area, on 18 September 1943. While leading his three-fighter division on a patrol over our base on Vella Lavella, Captain Cupp boldly intercepted an overwhelming force of fifteen hostile dive bombers and their fighter escorts threatening our installations. Promptly engaging the enemy, he personally blasted four bombers from the sky and assisted in the shooting down of another. By his superb skill, daring initiative and devotion to duty, Captain Cupp contributed to the success of his squadron and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Service: Marine Corps Reserve
Rank: Captain
Commander, South Pacific: Serial 02538 (March 19, 1947)

John Fray

Place of birth: Waterbury, Conn.
Home of record: Waterbury, Conn.

Awards and Citations
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded for actions during the World War I

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Corporal John P. Fray (ASN: 65276), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with Company H, 102d Infantry Regiment, 26th Division, A.E.F., at St. Hilaire, France, 18 September 1918. While under heavy enemy machine-gun fire, Corporal Fray charged a machine gun single-handed, putting it out of action and dispersing its crew. Later, as the raiding party withdrew, he assisted in carrying back the wounded.

Service: Army
Rank: Corporal
War Department, General Orders No. 26 (1919)

Clarence Geer

Place of birth: New Milford, Conn.
Home of record: Torrington, Conn.

Awards and Citations
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded for actions during the World War I

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to First Lieutenant (Infantry) Clarence W. Geer, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving with 102d Infantry Regiment, 26th Division, A.E.F., at St. Hilaire, France, September 18 – 19, 1918. While advancing with a raiding party, in the face of heavy machine-gun fire, he charged alone into the woods and captured two prisoners single-handed. After the raiding party had retired, he again went back alone into the woods under the same heavy machine-gun fire, to locate wounded who had been left behind. His courage and exceptional bravery set an example to his men which contributed greatly to the success of the raid.

Service: Army
Rank: First Lieutenant
War Department, General Orders 78 (1919)

9-11-01

Posted: 11 Sep 2009 in Hero
Tags:

Never forget.