Posts Tagged ‘Battle of Ganjgal’

…Dakota Meyer has a new book out that goes after the Army brass for their failure during the battle at Ganjgal in Kunar Province, Afghanistan where he fought and was eventually awarded the MOH for his actions.

There is a US Army Captain, Will Swenson that was there and was submitted for a MOH for his actions that day as well, but the Army in their typical handling of paperwork seems to have lost the packet.

I am pissed off that the Army hasn’t done more to correct a horrible injustice and am not surprised that the actions of a couple morons in the TOC out of 10th Mountain’s 1-32 Infantry screwed the pooch on this. An over zealous captain adhering to a moronic ROE is likely the issue with them not getting the artillery support that they so badly needed. I wasn’t there, but 20 years in the Army and some of that in a TOC environment, can sure make for some educated guesses.

The inaction of a couple officers, and I dare say some NCOs that were in all likelihood there in the TOC may well have cost the lives of a some Marines. This in my mind is shameful and an absolute embarrassment for the Army. I thought 10th Mountain was better than that.

At any rate, go read this, it’s important to know what went on at this battle, the good and the bad.

Dakota Meyer blasts Army brass in new book
By Dan Lamothe – Staff writer

WEST MILFORD, N.J. — During one of the Afghan war’s ugliest battles, Medal of Honor recipient Dakota Meyer was nearly taken prisoner at gunpoint but fended off his would-be captor by beating him to death with a baseball-sized rock, according to the Marine’s forthcoming book.

That is among several revelations in “Into the Fire: A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War.” It chronicles the disastrous Sept. 8, 2009, battle in Ganjgal, a mountainside village in Kunar province where U.S. Marines and soldiers, and their Afghan counterparts, were pinned down under fire for hours. The book, due to be released Sept. 25, is co-authored by Meyer and Bing West, a best-selling writer and former Marine infantryman.

Throughout the book, Meyer, a sergeant in the Marine Corps Individual Ready Reserve, takes aim at several targets — especially the Army officers he blames for allowing members of his team to die that day. He describes perceived flaws in the mission’s planning, outlines how officers at a nearby base refused to send help and questions why an Army captain who fought alongside him, Will Swenson, still hasn’t received any valor award despite being recommended for the Medal of Honor nearly three years ago.

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