Posts Tagged ‘Afghanistan’

…is well worth your time.

11 Facts About Medal of Honor Recipient Clinton Romesha

BY: Washington Free Beacon Staff
January 17, 2013 3:59 pm

Former Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha (ROE-muh-shay), 31, will receive the Medal of Honor next month for heroic actions during the day-long attack on Combat Outpost Keating in Afghanistan.

More than 300 Taliban attacked Keating early in the morning of Oct. 3, 2009, from all four sides and from higher ground. Armed with recoilless rifles, rocket-propelled grenades, mortars, machine guns, and rifles, the Taliban swarmed the site, occupied by only 53 Americans and two Latvians. A score of Afghans stationed there had abandoned the site. Mortars hit Keating every 15 seconds during the first three hours of the attack. Taliban breached the site and destroyed 70 percent of Keating with a fire.

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…are getting our Soldiers killed.
There’s no other way to say it.
And this President doesn’t give a shit about the Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines under his command.
As the Commander in Chief it is his responsibility to make sure that his policies aren’t getting our Soldiers killed needlessly.
His absolute lack of concern for the military in general is appalling to me. Thank God I retired before this douche bag was elected.
I thought Clinton was bad, but this guy takes the prize for worst C-i-C ever.

In Their Own Words: Obama’s Effect on Military Families
By Elise Cooper

President Obama seems to have a disregard for those defending America.  Recently, on Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show, he commented on the death of three Americans and Ambassador Chris Stevens: “… it’s not optimal.”  The mother of Sean Smith, a Foreign Service officer and one of the three killed, reportedly responded to the president: “My son is not very optimal. He is also very dead. It was a disrespectful thing to say[.]”

That is how many families feel about the president’s attitude toward those who have died serving their country.  Billy and Karen Vaughn spoke with American Thinker about their deceased Navy SEAL Team Six son, Aaron, and their views on this administration’s rules of engagement policies.

Aaron Vaughn was one of thirty U.S. service members, including 22 members of SEAL Team Six, killed when the helicopter they were traveling in was downed on August 5, 2011, in Afghanistan.  This was the largest loss of life in the history of naval special warfare.  At the time of his death, Aaron left behind a two-year-old son, a two-month-old daughter, his wife, and his parents.  He became a SEAL in 2004 and joined SEAL Team Six in 2010.  He was one of the few SEALs to get his name on the “First Time Every Time Wall,” an honor for those SEALs who passed every test on their first try.

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Read on:

…from Afghanistan.
There is only one question that needs to be answered.
Why are we still there?

America’s Dumbest War, Ever

Yesterday a concerned father forwarded to me a letter from his son in Afghanistan. I confirmed authenticity, and republish with permission:

Dad,

I am fed up. I cannot believe the lack of attention the recent changes in this war is receiving by the media or the country. I think I saw one thing on CNN about the following subject, but I had to dig extensively to find it. The purpose of this letter is to let you know of the garbage that our soldiers are going through right now. With this knowledge, I hope that you take action by writing your congressmen.

First, because of the recent green on blue incidents or “insider threats” as the new buzz phrase dictates, all coalition forces in Afghanistan have completely stopped partnering with the ANA, AUP, and ALP in order to prevent the death of anymore CF casualties by ANSF or Taliban disguised as them. This is also greatly spurred by President Karzi’s indifferent attitude and lack of action to take measures to prevent further insider attacks.

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…Dakota Meyer has a new book out that goes after the Army brass for their failure during the battle at Ganjgal in Kunar Province, Afghanistan where he fought and was eventually awarded the MOH for his actions.

There is a US Army Captain, Will Swenson that was there and was submitted for a MOH for his actions that day as well, but the Army in their typical handling of paperwork seems to have lost the packet.

I am pissed off that the Army hasn’t done more to correct a horrible injustice and am not surprised that the actions of a couple morons in the TOC out of 10th Mountain’s 1-32 Infantry screwed the pooch on this. An over zealous captain adhering to a moronic ROE is likely the issue with them not getting the artillery support that they so badly needed. I wasn’t there, but 20 years in the Army and some of that in a TOC environment, can sure make for some educated guesses.

The inaction of a couple officers, and I dare say some NCOs that were in all likelihood there in the TOC may well have cost the lives of a some Marines. This in my mind is shameful and an absolute embarrassment for the Army. I thought 10th Mountain was better than that.

At any rate, go read this, it’s important to know what went on at this battle, the good and the bad.

Dakota Meyer blasts Army brass in new book
By Dan Lamothe – Staff writer

WEST MILFORD, N.J. — During one of the Afghan war’s ugliest battles, Medal of Honor recipient Dakota Meyer was nearly taken prisoner at gunpoint but fended off his would-be captor by beating him to death with a baseball-sized rock, according to the Marine’s forthcoming book.

That is among several revelations in “Into the Fire: A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War.” It chronicles the disastrous Sept. 8, 2009, battle in Ganjgal, a mountainside village in Kunar province where U.S. Marines and soldiers, and their Afghan counterparts, were pinned down under fire for hours. The book, due to be released Sept. 25, is co-authored by Meyer and Bing West, a best-selling writer and former Marine infantryman.

Throughout the book, Meyer, a sergeant in the Marine Corps Individual Ready Reserve, takes aim at several targets — especially the Army officers he blames for allowing members of his team to die that day. He describes perceived flaws in the mission’s planning, outlines how officers at a nearby base refused to send help and questions why an Army captain who fought alongside him, Will Swenson, still hasn’t received any valor award despite being recommended for the Medal of Honor nearly three years ago.

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…are now allowed to be armed.

WTF?

Why weren’t they armed from the get go? They are in a fucking war zone. You carry your weapon loaded at all times. Even if you are a fobbit.

Sometimes the PC mentality of the military really does get people killed. It’s gotten 10 Soldiers killed in the last two weeks.

The PC generals need to get shit canned.

Morons.

All coalition troops at Afghan bases now armed around the clock
By Barbara Starr

The uptick in attacks by Afghan security forces against coalition troops has hit home, with all troops at NATO headquarters and all bases across Afghanistan now ordered to carry loaded weapons around the clock, CNN learned Friday.

Gen. John Allen, the NATO commander in Afghanistan, ordered the move, according to a U.S. official with direct knowledge of the orders. The order, made in recent days, was divulged amid two more so-called green-on-blue or insider attacks Friday.

via All coalition troops at Afghan bases now armed around the clock – CNN.

This is a must read. You won’t see it, or hear of it in the MSM. Doesn’t fit the narrative.

The Real Face Of American Servicemen And Women Spc. Dennis Weichel

While the media focuses on the case of Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, it is worth remembering that he is the overwhelming exception.

Spc. Dennis Weichel of the Rhode Island National Guard is far more representative of the selfless sacrifice and honor exhibited by the US military during 2 wars and over 10 years of fighting. But even within the ranks of heroic actions, Spc. Weichel’s sacrifice stands out.

The official Pentagon news release says he died “from injuries suffered in a noncombat related incident.” But there is much more to the story. Weichel, 29, of Providence, died saving the life of a little girl.

According to the Rhode Island National Guard and the U.S. Army, Weichel was in a convoy a week ago with his unit in Laghman Province, in northeast Afghanistan. Some children were in the road in front of the convoy, and Weichel and other troops got out to move them out of the way.

Most of the children moved, but one little girl went back to pick up some brass shell casings in the road. Afghan civilians often recycle the casings, and the girl appeared to aim to do that. But a Mine-Resistant Ambush-Protected vehicle was moving toward her, according to Lt. Col. Denis Riel of the Rhode Island National Guard.

MRAPs, as they are known, usually weigh more than 16 tons.

Weichel saw the massive truck bearing down on the girl and grabbed her out of the way. But in the process, the armored truck ran him over, Riel said.

The little girl is fine. Weichel died a short time later of his injuries.

Specialist Weichel leaves behind his fiance and three children.

via The Real Face Of American Servicemen And Women Spc. Dennis Weichel.

I heard this on the Dennis Miller show this morning. It is a organization that is trying to get a flag recognized by the US and the states, for fallen Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and the Coast Guard, that have died in combat.

I lost a good friend in Iraq in 2006. I think about him every day. I think this is a worthy cause and deserves your support. Please go to their website and check out the flag, and donate, sign their petition, buy a flag, spread the word.

Thanks.

Honor and Remember

In the more than 200 years of our nation’s history there has never been an officially designated symbol that reminds us specifically of the sacrifice made by members of our military and the lives lost in service to our country.We propose the Honor and Remember Flag as the national emblem for that purpose.

via Honor and Remember, Inc..

I like it when there’s another dead tango to report. At least Obama is getting this one right. Credit where it’s due, I suppose. He’s still a SCOAMF, but at least he’s still letting the sheepdogs kill the wolves.

US drone-fired missiles suspected to have killed Al Qaeda’s Pakistani leader, 3 others

PESHAWAR, Pakistan – A US drone strike on a house in northern Pakistan killed at least four suspected militants, and is suspected to have killed Al Qaeda’s Pakistani leader Badar Mansoor, Fox News reports.

The attack is the second in 24 hours. A strike Wednesday in the same area killed at least 10 and several others were injured.

The back-to-back strikes could be an indication the drone program is picking up steam again after a slowdown caused by tensions with Pakistan over accidental American airstrikes that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers last year.

The U.S. held off on carrying out drone strikes for over six weeks after the deadly accident on Nov. 26. There have been a handful of attacks since they resumed in January, but the last two are the first consecutive strikes since the border incident.

The house hit before dawn on Thursday was located in the main bazaar in Miran Shah, the biggest town in the North Waziristan tribal area, the country’s main sanctuary for Taliban and Al Qaeda militants, said Pakistani intelligence officials. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media.

via Report: US Drone-fired Missiles Suspected To Have Killed Al Qaeda’s Pakistani Leader, 3 Others | Fox News.

With this title, how could I not post it? Good read.

Truth, lies and Afghanistan

How military leaders have let us down

By LT. COL. DANIEL L. DAVIS

I spent last year in Afghanistan, visiting and talking with U.S. troops and their Afghan partners. My duties with the Army’s Rapid Equipping Force took me into every significant area where our soldiers engage the enemy. Over the course of 12 months, I covered more than 9,000 miles and talked, traveled and patrolled with troops in Kandahar, Kunar, Ghazni, Khost, Paktika, Kunduz, Balkh, Nangarhar and other provinces.

What I saw bore no resemblance to rosy official statements by U.S. military leaders about conditions on the ground.

Entering this deployment, I was sincerely hoping to learn that the claims were true: that conditions in Afghanistan were improving, that the local government and military were progressing toward self-sufficiency. I did not need to witness dramatic improvements to be reassured, but merely hoped to see evidence of positive trends, to see companies or battalions produce even minimal but sustainable progress.

Instead, I witnessed the absence of success on virtually every level.

My arrival in country in late 2010 marked the start of my fourth combat deployment, and my second in Afghanistan. A Regular Army officer in the Armor Branch, I served in Operation Desert Storm, in Afghanistan in 2005-06 and in Iraq in 2008-09. In the middle of my career, I spent eight years in the U.S. Army Reserve and held a number of civilian jobs — among them, legislative correspondent for defense and foreign affairs for Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas.

As a representative for the Rapid Equipping Force, I set out to talk to our troops about their needs and their circumstances. Along the way, I conducted mounted and dismounted combat patrols, spending time with conventional and Special Forces troops. I interviewed or had conversations with more than 250 soldiers in the field, from the lowest-ranking 19-year-old private to division commanders and staff members at every echelon. I spoke at length with Afghan security officials, Afghan civilians and a few village elders.

I saw the incredible difficulties any military force would have to pacify even a single area of any of those provinces; I heard many stories of how insurgents controlled virtually every piece of land beyond eyeshot of a U.S. or International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) base.

I saw little to no evidence the local governments were able to provide for the basic needs of the people. Some of the Afghan civilians I talked with said the people didn’t want to be connected to a predatory or incapable local government.

From time to time, I observed Afghan Security forces collude with the insurgency.

via Truth, lies and Afghanistan – February 2012 – Armed Forces Journal – Military Strategy, Global Defense Strategy.

The CRS has released the casualties numbers for Afghanistan.
The last two years have been the worst.

Afghanistan Casualties – Military and Civilians