…of public sector unions.

It’s disgusting to me that PSUs get away with the bullshit that they get away with. The teacher’s unions always screaming “it’s for the children,” when in reality it is for them. It is their greed and their pensions that need to be padded by the public through taxation. These unions have a monopoly that must be broken up in order to bring sanity to the fiscal problems that most cities have these days.

They don’t want to have standards imposed on them that would threaten their tenure. Accountability for their crappy education skills are constantly being fought tooth and nail. Just look at the graduation rates across the country. Chicago has a 40% dropout rate. And they want more money for that shit? Pathetic.

Charter schools are a way to put a stop to the monopoly of teacher’s unions. The schools are better and the kids get a better education. It’s a fact.

Take Chicago, please.
Here’s an excellent article that goes in depth on this issue.

How to Stymie the Teachers Unions
by Richard A. Epstein

Want to prevent another Chicago? Let charter schools flourish.

n September 18, 2012, the Chicago Teachers Union negotiated a settlement with the City after going on strike for seven days. At issue in the dispute were critical issues like teacher salaries, working conditions, and teacher evaluations. As is typical in these situations, neither side held all the high cards. The two parties had to agree to compromises that patched up the current difficulties without implementing any sensible long-term reforms.

The wage piece of the deal is likely to add about $74 million per year over the next four years to a municipal budget that is already deeply in the red. The extra dollars that go into wages will be taken out of other budgets, rendering classrooms and other facilities less suitable than before. The moderately stiffer standards for teacher evaluation, both before and after tenure, may make marginal improvements in teaching performance, but none that will be significant in the short term. The overall dismal performance of the Chicago public school system, with its 60 percent graduation rate, will remain more or less what it has been.

The recent news affirms that public education in Chicago and other major cities needs to be fundamentally overhauled. The first item on the reform list should be the collective bargaining system, which has taken over public education for the last fifty or so years. Collective bargaining has its roots in the private sector, where it received a huge boost from the passage of the National Labor Relations Act of 1935.



  1. J. Palmer says:

    Yeah, screw those greedy teachers with their pretentious bachelor’s degrees, five-figure salaries, and flashy four-door family sedans. Who needs ’em?

    If only Americans had the right to educate their own children at home.

    • 1IDVET says:

      I don’t begrudge them making money, I don’t like the way they go about strong arming the public into thinking that they are doing this for the kids.
      If they were better at teaching than they were at protesting, then maybe they’d be worth the salary they get.
      They don’t even work a full year and make more money than most of the parents that send kids to these hell holes.
      The success rate of the students is not commensurate with their pay, or the benefits that they receive.
      Charter schools on the other hand have standards that most of these public sector schools couldn’t even come close to.
      A teacher with a bachelor’s degree is nothing special. Sorry. That doesn’t fly.