Archive for the ‘Veterans’ Category

…a video with Wild Bill for America.
The John Boehner Republicans join the Democrats in destroying the morale of our military.

Vets and Guns…

Posted: 10 Feb 2014 in Gun Rights, Guns, Military, Politics, Veterans
Tags:

…Veterans are being discriminated against because of paperwork, among other things.
What a failure.

http://www.nranews.com/commentators/video/episode-35-vets-with-dom-raso

…a letter that should be read in all corners.

As a Veteran, I will never support any of the douche-bag sell outs that are running the GOP or voted for this bill.

Your failure is complete.

This letter says it all.

To Congressman Paul RyanToday

Congressman Ryan,

Please note that this request by you for a cash donation from me is extremely unfortunate and very ill-timed. You see sir, I am one of the military retirees your “bipartisan” budget just impacted. You and every Republican both in the House and Senate that voted to pass this travesty betrayed and broke trust with me and everyone like me. You may not know us by name, but we’re the people, Congressman, who answered our Nation’s call, some of us at a very early age to willingly serve YOU and others LIKE YOU so you could safely attend college and pursue your personal ambitions without fear of harm.

You might also want to note that for at least 20 years, my brothers-in-arms answered that call of duty EVERY SINGLE DAY, without fail, without complaint, without enough money to sustain our loved ones we had to leave behind while we DID OUR JOB in every corner of the Earth. And for that service, we were given absolute assurance our so-called retirement benefits would be protected by law. The very law you shattered in your zeal to impress your Democratic cohorts in your back room deal–with the enemy. Yes, I said it. The liberal Democrats are an enemy to the American people and our Nation. Your lack of judgement and eagerness to compromise on the backs of us who protected you is sickening. Congressman, you and every Republican that voted for injuring military retirees have engaged in a complicit, sordid affair with the Democrats who’s objective has always been to dismantle the military. By climbing into their bed on this issue, you have confirmed you are absolutely no better than they and have proven it with your vote.

Congressman Ryan, the audacity which you display is noteworthy, but to unceremoniously snatch earned money from a small group that has added so much more value than the paltry $6B you looked to “save” which is all smoke and mirrors and you know it, is reprehensible and insulting.

We have, despite the hardships, meager salaries and harsh conditions, have performed with honor and excellence…in silence, which is something most members of Congress have no idea about doing. Our job approval was, is and always be better than yours. We knew our mission and we got it done, then handed it off to a new generation in better shape than we found it.

Your ability to look us in the eye, take money from us apparently there was ZERO, other source of waste within the federal government that you could have recovered this money from…right, got it, while simultaneously holding your hand out to beg with passion for our cash is stunning. Your actions have proven you do not have the tremendous intellect you’ve sold the American people on. I say, with all seriousness, Congressman, what you lack in intellect and spinal rigidity, you make up for in cajones.

I hope you and your cowardly, Republican “colleagues” hear a message from me loud and clear. You will NEVER receive another cent of financial support from me. Further, if you happen to be at a Capitol Hill dinner or at a K Street cocktail party with RNC Chair Reince Priebus, Rep. Ron Barber, Sen. Jeff Flake or Sen. John McCain, I would be honored if you communicate with them that I am launching an effort to ensure NONE of you traitorous “representatives of the people” ever receive another vote from a military retiree. Remove me from your contact lists.

Chuck Wooten,Chief Master Sergeant, USAF Ret

via Open Letter: Veteran Blasts Rep. Paul Ryan Over His Back Room Budget Deal “With the Enemy” | Right Wing News.

…to all my Brothers and Sisters who have served with honor for this country.
You Rock!
Veterans-Day4

…a great read.

Soldiers recall Vietnam firefight that led to posthumous MoH for Cpl.

PHILADELPHIA — It was called a “fortress in the clouds.”

The 21st Regiment of the Second Division of the North Vietnamese Army had carved a stronghold into the steep slopes of Nui Chom, a mountain with rugged peaks covered by a towering jungle canopy that blocked the sky. There, the NVA had dug 250 machine-gun bunkers to defend a secret field hospital.

On Nov. 20, 1968, Michael J. Crescenz of Philadelphia walked into an ambush on Nui Chom. His squad was pinned down when he made a snap decision to grab an M60 machine gun and charge the bunkers. He took out three, killing six enemy soldiers who may have been dumbstruck in their last seconds to see a lone American running into their fusillade of bullets.

As he charged a fourth bunker, Crescenz, 19, was killed.

via Soldiers recall Vietnam firefight that led to posthumous MoH for Cpl. | Army Times | armytimes.com.

Today is the birthday of the 1st Infantry Division. The Big Red One. It is the oldest continuously active division in the Army. To my fellow Big Red One Veterans, happy birthday to a great Division and to all who have served in the Big Red One, her history includes you. Well done and congratulations!

The 1st Infantry Division Patch World War I
1st Infantry Division Patch Modern Day

World War I

The First Expeditionary Division was constituted in May 1917 from Army units then in service on the Mexican border and at various Army posts throughout the United States. On June 8, 1917 it was officially organized in New York, New York. This date is the 1st Infantry Division’s official birthday. The first units sailed from New York and Hoboken, N.J., June 14, 1917. Throughout the remainder of the year, the rest of the Division followed, landing at St. Nazaire, France, and Liverpool, England. After a brief stay in rest camps, the troops in England proceeded to France, landing at Le Havre. The last unit arrived in St. Nazaire on Dec. 22. Upon arrival in France, the Division, less its artillery, was assembled in the First (Gondrecourt) training area, and the artillery was at Le Valdahon.

On the 4th of July, the 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry, paraded through the streets of Paris to bolster the sagging French spirits. At Lafayette’s tomb, one of General Pershing’s staff uttered the famous words, “Lafayette, we are here!” Two days later, July 6, the First Expeditionary Division was redesignated the First Infantry Division. On the morning of Oct. 23, the first American shell of the war was sent screaming toward German lines by Battery C, 6th Field Artillery. Two days later, the 2nd Bn., 16th Inf., suffered the first American casualties of the war.

By April 1918, the Germans had pushed to within 40 miles of Paris. In reaction to this thrust, the Big Red One moved into the Picardy Sector to bolster the exhausted French First Army. To the Division’s front lay the small village of Cantigny, situated on the high ground overlooking a forested countryside. It was the 28th Infantry, who attacked the town, and within 45 minutes captured it along with 250 German soldiers, thus earning the special designation “Lions of Cantigny” for the regiment. The first American victory of the war was a First Division victory.

The First Division took Soissons in July 1918. The Soissons victory was costly – more than 7000 men were killed or wounded. The First Infantry Division then helped to clear the St. Mihiel salient by fighting continuously from Sept. 11-13, 1918. The last major World War I battle was fought in the Meuse-Argonne Forest. The Division advanced seven kilometers and defeated, in whole or part, eight German divisions. This action cost the 1st Division over 7600 casualties. In October 1918, the Big Red One patch as it is now known was officially approved for wear by members of the Division.

The war was over when the Armistice was signed on November 11, 1918. The Division was then located at Sedan, the farthest American penetration of the war. The Division was the first to cross the Rhine into occupied Germany where it remained until the peace treaty formally ending WW I was signed. It deployed back to the United States in August and September.

By the end of the war, the Division had suffered 22,668 casualties and boasted five Medal of Honor recipients. Its colors carry campaign streamers for: Montdidier-Noyon; Aisne-Marne; St. Mihiel; Meuse- Argonne; Lorraine1 917; Lorraine, 1918; Picardy, 1918.

World War II

On On August 1, 1942, the first Division was reorganized and redesignated as the 1st Infantry Division.

The 1st Infantry Division entered combat in World War II as part of “Operation Torch”, the invasion of North Africa, the first American campaign against the Axis powers. On Nov. 8, 1942, following training in the United Kingdom, men of the First Division landed on the coast of Algeria near Oran. The initial lessons of combat were harsh and many men were casualties in the campaign that followed and which stretched from Algiers into Tunisia. On May 9, 1943, the commander of the German “Afrika Korps” surrendered his force of 40,000 and North African operations for the Big Red One ended. The Division then moved on to take Sicily in “Operation Husky.” It stormed ashore at Gela, July 10, 1943, and quickly overpowered the Italian defenses. Soon after, the Division came face-to-face with 100 tanks of the Herman Goering Tank Division. With the help of naval gunfire, its own artillery and Canadian allies, the First Infantry Division fought its way over the island’s hills, driving the enemy back. The Fighting First advanced on to capture Troina and opened the Allied road to the straits of Messina. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, the Big Red One stormed ashore at Omaha Beach. Soon after H-Hour, the Division’s 16th Infantry Regiment was fighting for its life on a strip of beach near Coleville-sur-Mer that had been marked the “Easy Red” on battle maps. As the assault progressed, the beach became so congested with destroyed equipment, the dead and the wounded, that there was little room to land reinforcements. Col. George Taylor, commander of the 16th Infantry Regt., told his men, “Two kinds of people are staying on this beach! The dead and those who are going to die! Now, let’s get the hell out of here!” Slowly, spurred by the individual heroism of many individuals, the move inland got underway.

A German blockhouse above the beach became a command post named “Danger Forward.”

After the beachhead was secured, the Division moved through the Normandy Hedgerows. The Division liberated Liege, Belgium, and pushed to the German border, crossing through the fortified Siegfried line. The 1st Inf. Div. attacked the first major German city, Aachen, and after many days of bitter house-to house fighting, the German commander surrendered the city on Oct. 21, 1944.

The Division continued its push into Germany, crossing the Rhine River. On Dec. 16, 24 enemy divisions, 10 of which were armored, launched a massive counterattack in the Ardennes sector, resulting in what became known as the Battle of the Bulge. The Big Red One held the critical shoulder of the “Bulge” at Bullingen, destroying hundreds of German tanks in the process. On Jan. 15, 1945, the First Infantry attacked and penetrated the Siegfried line for the second time and occupied the Remagen bridgehead. On Easter Sunday, April 1, 1945, the Division marched 150 miles to the east of Siegen. On April 8, the Division crossed the Weser River into Czechoslovakia. The war was over May 8, 1945.

At the end of World War II, the Division had suffered 21,023 casualties and 43,743 men had served in its ranks. Its soldiers had won a total of 20,752 medals and awards, including 16 Congressional Medals of Honor. Over 100,000 prisoners had been taken.
Following the war, the First Division remained in Germany as occupation troops, until 1955, when the Division moved to Fort Riley, Kan.

You can read the rest of the Division’s history here: Society of the First Infantry Division

…the invasion of Europe began.

D-Day. June 6, 1944.

On that day, thousands of men and equipment stormed ashore at a place called Normandy.
Brothers in arms fought and died on those beaches by the thousands.
Their sacrifice was heavy, their victory was total.

I choke up thinking about the bravery that these men showed in the face of certain death. Many watched as their friends died right in front of them, or right next to them, wondering if they were next, but persevering until the beach was taken.

Some of those men would die in the heavy fighting that continued after the D-Day landings.

Never forget the sacrifices made by this greatest of generations. The survivors of World War II are dying at the rate of 600 a day. If you have the honor of seeing one, let them know you appreciate their service. Honor their sacrifice.

Please visit the Army’s website dedicated to the D-Day invasion. US Army June 6, 1944 D-Day

Of all the divisions that were involved in the D-Day invasion, I had the honor of serving in 5 of those divisions in my Army career. The 1st Infantry Division, the 2nd Infantry Division, the 4th Infantry Division, the 8th Infantry Division, and the 3rd Armored Division.

D-Day vet: “We made a difference”

By:O’Ryan Johnson

One of the Bay State’s dwindling number of D-Day veterans recalls the Normandy Invasion — 69 years ago today — as a day when he and other young men “made a difference.”

“I’m proud of it. I have a lot of personal satisfaction. If it weren’t for the Rangers, they would have lost the beach,” said James Gabaree, an old Ranger who fought and nearly died in the largest armed invasion in history, known as Operation Overlord.

“We made a difference,” said Gabaree, 88, who landed at Omaha Beach with the 5th Ranger Battalion, part of an invasion force of 160,000 American, British and Canadian troops who established a foothold in Nazi-occupied western Europe.

via D-Day vet: “We made a difference” | Boston Herald.

Remembering D-Day: As WWII veteran ranks thin, those who remain recall invasion

CHILLICOTHE — As Americans mark yet another solemn anniversary of the D-Day invasion, those who fought in World War II, including the ones who stormed the beaches of Normandy 69 years ago today, continue to slip away.

World War II veterans are dying at a rate of more than 600 each day, meaning tales of combat in Europe and the Pacific are more likely to come from a book or a website than from the veterans themselves.

Milestones such as the anniversary of D-Day — the airborne and amphibious assault that began June 6, 1944, launching the Allied forces’ invasion of German-occupied western Europe — underscore how many of these veterans are gone, but also illuminates the contributions of those who remain.

As a member of the Scioto Valley and Ross County veterans honor guards, Carl Jividen, 92, has paid tribute to more than his fair share of deceased veterans.

More

Memorial Day seems to be forgotten for its original intent. Now people think it’s a long weekend signifying the start of summer and a time to break out the BBQs.

Please remember our fallen brothers and sisters this weekend. Fly the flag. Remember that your weekend BBQ came at a great price. Freedom is never free.

Memorial Day

By RU Rob

While Memorial Day in the United States often induces thoughts of the beginning of summer, BBQ’s and a long holiday weekend, it is not celebrated as intended. Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in our nation’s service. There are many stories as to its actual beginnings, with over two dozen cities and towns laying claim to being its birthplace but was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11, and was first observed on 30 May 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery.

Traditional observance of Memorial Day has sadly diminished over the years. Many Americans nowadays have forgotten the meaning and traditions of Memorial Day as well as its importance to many who have lost someone in the service to the country. At many cemeteries, the graves of the fallen are increasingly ignored, neglected and have fallen into a state of disrepair. Most people no longer remember the proper flag etiquette for the day. While there are towns and cities that still hold Memorial Day parades, many have not held a parade in decades. Some people think the day is for honoring any and all dead, and not just those fallen in service to our country.

There are a few notable exceptions. Since the late 50′s on the Thursday before Memorial Day, the 1,200 soldiers of the 3d U.S. Infantry place small American flags at each of the more than 260,000 gravestones at Arlington National Cemetery. They then patrol 24 hours a day during the weekend to ensure that each flag remains standing. In 1951, the Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts of St. Louis began placing flags on the 150,000 graves at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery as an annual Good Turn, a practice that continues to this day. More recently, beginning in 1998, on the Saturday before the observed day for Memorial Day, the Boys Scouts and Girl Scouts place a candle at each of approximately 15,300 grave sites of soldiers buried at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park on Marye’s Heights.

via Memorial Day – Rhino Den | Military Stories, MMA News, Army, Air Force, Marines, Navy.

…in any way the politicians can get away with.

Are you wondering what this Administration has done to the military? How about what they’ve done to benefits for the military?

Tricare, tuition assistance and many other programs that are used for retention and quality of life get stripped from the military whenever there is a budget crisis.

Instead of cutting the waste out of the budget as they should, they cut the very programs that are meant to retain soldiers in the military.

Our Armed Forces are heading towards a hollow shell that will be rife with morale and discipline issues very soon if not already.

Promises made are seldom kept when it comes to the military, veterans and retirees.

The voters in this country are supposed to look out for the military.

Politicians just see it as low hanging fruit in Washington and will hack away at it until it is no longer a viable force.

American Journal March 11, 2013 Soldiers Slighted
J.D. Pendry

Recently, my wife and I received our letters. They were signed by W. Bryan Gamble, M.D., FACS, Brigadier General, US Army. His signature block identifies him as the Deputy Director of the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, Health Affairs.

“Beginning October 1, 2013, TRICARE Prime [our healthcare insurance] coverage will not be available where you currently live…”

The letter tells us that we may still be able to enroll in TRICARE Prime at a military treatment facility. I mention that for the benefit of our Congressional representatives from the state of West Virginia who should know that there are no military treatment facilities in our state. I do not recall any of them raising a ruckus.

The General, whose letter was signed with an illegible electronic pen scribble, also instructed us:

“As you prepare for this change, you should look carefully at your health care options, such as using TRICARE Standard and TRICARE Extra or obtaining insurance through a spouse or an employer.” [because the country you and your family served is finished with you]

All of those options are more expensive than TRICARE Prime. Not to worry about my wife or me. We will survive. We always have. We left the military with about the same as we had when we entered it. Enlisted military families who serve a lifetime in uniform do not have much opportunity to build wealth. Our pensions are never enough to live on, so regardless of the years in uniform work after service remains a necessity. Health care coverage offered through TRICARE Prime is a significant retirement benefit. There will be no increase in pensions to make up for the added costs. Some of us caught in the window where work is ended and age 65 has not yet arrived must just suck it up.

via American Journal March 11, 2013 Soldiers Slighted « JDs Bunker.

…and his Veterans Gun Ban legislation. This turncoat traitorous piece of shit just got reelected on a platform supporting gun rights. Now that he suckered the West Virginians into voting for his sorry ass, he’s turning into a Democrat’s dream date. Fucking piece  of shit. Let him know how you feel and let your senators know how you feel on this issue. I have two of the WORST FUCKING SENATORS in America that represents (not) me, but I still tell those two idiots how I feel.

Let them hear you!

This is from Gun Owners of America.

Oppose Joe Manchin’s Veterans Gun Ban

and National Gun Registry

 

Reports out of Capitol Hill reveal that just-reelected turncoat West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin is about to stick a big knife in the back of American gun owners.  And to make matters worse, he’s lying about what he’s doing.

Both Manchin and House anti-gun crazy Carolyn McCarthy are claiming to be “working with NRA” to enact gun bans and national gun registries.  NRA says flatly that Manchin is lying, and we believe he is. (The Hill, 1/24/13)

Ironically, Manchin was the “gun owner’s best friend” on November 5 — the day before his reelection to a six-year term let him to pull a great big “gotcha” on those West Virginians who were tricked into believing his representations.

But make no mistake about it:  Joe Manchin’s draft would impose a gun ban on veterans and would set up the framework for a national gun registry.

150,000 honest law-abiding veterans are currently in the NICS system.  They didn’t do anything wrong; they honorably served their country.  But when they sought VA counseling for a traumatic combat experience, the VA appointed a fiduciary to oversee their fiscal affairs and then took away their guns.  And, again, there are 150,000 honest veterans in the system.

New York Senator Charles Schumer viciously fought a Coburn amendment on the DoD bill which would require that veterans get their day in court before their rights were taken away from them, and he won.

What the Manchin bill is about is insuring that “bad guys” like veterans can’t get guns.  And, under Barack Obama’s “Executive Action #1,” the NICS list could soon include tens of millions of additional soldiers, police, firemen, and other law-abiding Americans.

But veteran disarmament is not the only problem with Joe Manchin’s gun ban.

Manchin’s bill would set the framework for a national gun registry and impose a chokehold on gun sales.  There are at least four big reasons for this:

FIRST:  Every gun owner in the country would have a “Form 4473.”  Increasingly, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & Explosives are going into gun dealerships and illegally copying all of those 4473′s.

SECOND:  The FBI refuses to tell us how or whether it’s complying with federal law by destroying the Brady Check names, rather than keeping them for a national gun registry.

THIRD:  As it is, the Brady Check system is breaking down on days such as last year’s Black Friday — outlawing all gun purchases.  If you have to drive 200 miles from your farm to sell your gun to your neighbor, this effectively outlaws any efforts to sell or buy a gun.

FOURTH:  Increasingly, the FBI is blocking transfers because someone’s name is “similar” to someone else.  When the legal purchaser complains, the FBI’s response is “Sue us!”

ACTIONPlease click here to contact your U.S. Senators.  Ask them to oppose Joe Manchin’s veterans gun ban and national gun registry.