Archive for 20 Nov 2012

1IDVET:

What’s not to like?

Originally posted on College Life, Hot Girls, Funny Pics, Sexy Cheerleaders: COED:

Here are the things I’m thankful for: when a bartender comps half my tab, when I find a low min blackjack table with no one sitting at it, when I go to smoke marijuana and I’m not out of marijuana. These are the important things in life.

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…the government wienies have decided to place the burden of the coming fiscal cliff on the backs of military retirees.

This will effect all military retirees, and those that intend to retire. This will in all likelihood hurt recruiting and retention efforts across the board as well.

Write the morons that represent you and let them know in no uncertain terms, that putting the fiscal cliff on our backs is not how it’s supposed to work. Tell those morons to do their damn jobs and stop screwing us over.

Avoiding the ‘Fiscal Cliff’ May be as Painful as Going Over It
Terry Howell

This week Tom Philpott reported that the Congressional Budget Office has put a red “laser dot” on future pay raises, TRICARE, and future retirement benefits.

In their report, the CBO says annual military pay raises have exceeded civilian wage growth over the last 10 years. In fact the CBO estimates that military pay increased by 52 percent from 2002 to 2010 while civilian wages rose only 24 percent.

The CBO says that any impact reducing pay increases might have on recruiting and retention can be mitigated by offering larger enlistment and reenlistment bonuses.   The CBO pay cap option would mean military pay would lose nine percent to private sector wage growth over the five-year period.The CBO also suggests an option to raise TRICARE enrollment fees, deductibles or copayments, actions also proposed by the administration last April.  For working-age retirees, those under 65, fee hikes should be phased over five years and use a “tiered approach” so that senior-grade retirees would pay higher fees than lower-ranking retirees.

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…here’s today’s reading list. Don’t forget I’m om Twitter @1IDVET. I tweet more stuff as I read it.

Elections (They have consequences).

 Liberalism is a Mental Disorder

 Benghazi

Jihad/Islam/Muslim/Child Murdering Bastards

Gun Rights

Economics

Military

Faster than NATO, France ends Afghan combat role

Misc

Media Bias

…you can pretty much give up on having any privacy in the United States. In fact, you can pretty much toss out the Fourth Amendment while you’re at it.
If this shit doesn’t give you chills, nothing will.

First Obama signs the NDAA into law giving the military the power to arrest American citizens without charges, or due process of law, and now the Senate is looking to add to that fiasco by allowing law enforcement to read your email, access your internet accounts and social media without a warrant, without any judicial oversight, and without your knowledge.

America has lost its way.

Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants
by Declan McCullagh

Proposed law scheduled for a vote next week originally increased Americans’ e-mail privacy. Then law enforcement complained. Now it increases government access to e-mail and other digital files.

A Senate proposal touted as protecting Americans’ e-mail privacy has been quietly rewritten, giving government agencies more surveillance power than they possess under current law.

CNET has learned that Patrick Leahy, the influential Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee, has dramatically reshaped his legislation in response to law enforcement concerns. A vote on his bill, which now authorizes warrantless access to Americans’ e-mail, is scheduled for next week.

Leahy’s rewritten bill would allow more than 22 agencies — including the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Communications Commission — to access Americans’ e-mail, Google Docs files, Facebook wall posts, and Twitter direct messages without a search warrant. It also would give the FBI and Homeland Security more authority, in some circumstances, to gain full access to Internet accounts without notifying either the owner or a judge.

It’s an abrupt departure from Leahy’s earlier approach, which required police to obtain a search warrant backed by probable cause before they could read the contents of e-mail or other communications. The Vermont Democrat boasted last year that his bill “provides enhanced privacy protections for American consumers by… requiring that the government obtain a search warrant.”

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